About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
MSNBCW 19
CSPAN 12
CNNW 11
MSNBC 9
CNN 5
CSPAN2 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
WBAL (NBC) 2
FBC 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 84
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
. al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> it may be a new al qaeda, a more splintered al qaeda, but they don't, certainly, when you look at the most broad response in american history, you're closing 21 embassies, certainly don't seem to be on the run. >> i think we've got to be on the alert for this. yes, we did take out osama bin laden. and as soon as the next chief pops up we take him out in the central node of al qaeda. it's still dangerous. and it can transform itself. you've got people who spend their lives plotting how to hurt americans. so until every one of those people is eliminated or they change their motivations, we've got a continuing issue. i think what the president was trying to say was the central nervous system of the old al qaeda has been broken and broken down and decapitated with getting rid of osama bin laden. and that's a good thing, but it's not the end of it. >> thanks to each of you. >>> as many of you know, we have devoted much of our program over the past year to the benghazi attacks and their afteras a matter of fact. please join us on tuesda
the country's capacity for self inflicted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and points out there is always a nightmare of acquiring use -- terrorists acquiring and using these weapons of mass destruction that nothing would give them greater satisfaction that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it, since 9/11, the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries , has remained, frankly, open and free. we continued to have super bowl's and people travel abroad and robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use the analogy of it is like a hurricane. forecasting weather a potential storm and we're battening down the hatches and a few limited places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward and a way i think is professionally responsible and they are being advised not just by political advisers but also the cia -- one of my old agenci
office? osama bin laden was caught on tape saying he wanted to bleed america to the point of bankruptcy. -- -- if 250,000 people take that us and because of some poison in washington dc, it is our own overreaction that a self-destructing. security, a total budget of $40 billion, a lot of things combined into one -- we're not talking about that large amount of money. picture, -- you said, be aware of the bodies. if we hadn't stopped the time square plot, the london , there are three or fourth -- 3000 or 4000 people right there. there are any number of others that have been stopped. i wish the rest of the country would use the nypd as a model. there is so much done as far as cooperation between the government and suppliers and distributors and merchants so if somebody goes to buy explosives, devices,buys certain that is taken to the nypd and they can follow up on it. i would just say 3000 bodies is terrible, but that is 3000wide, when every year die in house fires in america. if there was a successful dirty bomb attack, it could neutralize an entire city. one dirty bomb going off in downt
. these are armed attacks with r.p.g.'s, et cetera. it does make you wonder the kill of osama bin laden, a profound moral victory, didn't end the effectiveness of al qaeda. this is being manned by al zawahari who is at large. maybe we didn't end al qaeda by going -- >>steve: maybe we busted into the centralized al qaeda h.q. now it's fragmented all over. some are wondering whether or not you look at what happened in benghazi, where they killed four brave americans, clearly some sort of al qaeda-linked terror attack, and who's been held accountable. nobody. even though we knew, "the new york times" talked to some of the suspects and others have since then, we haven't done anything. now some are wondering is this a gross overreaction to some intel? susan rice, who is currently running the n.s.a., reportedly sees similarities trying to make sure this is not a repeat of what happened last year. here's lindsay graham and bill crystal. >> they are taking the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there, reporting was real and we dropped the ball. we've learned from
even osama bin laden. there is always the nightmare of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass destruction, but nothing would give the terrorists enemies greater satisfaction than that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: this is always a difficult debate. i think that if we step back d look at it since 9/11, the united states, even though we're one of the most open and free countries has remained, frankly, open and free. we have continued to have super bowls. we continue to have our people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use an analogy of it's like a hurricane. we have some weather forecasting that says will is going to be a potential storm. we're battening down the hatches in a few limiting places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward in a way that i think is professionally responsible and they're being advised by not just their political advisors, but also by the c.i.a., one of the old agencies,
to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wagood morning. >> good morning. >> the president says al qaeda has been hammered. he said they are on their way to defeat. from a messaging standpoint, how tricky is it to send that reassuring message at the same time you are evacuating americans? >> i think they are te directly linked. there is clear intelligence that the administration has received that these embassies are being targeted overseas. there is a clear oh effort by the administration to use the drone strikes against what they see as a
senior al qaeda leaders and no warning since the killing of osama bin laden in may of 2011. something serious they've heard. i also think this is the reaction of the benghazi scandal. the administration does want to look like it's lax on security and not being aggressive enough. i think they're also being very, very broad in terms of shutting down so many embassies to be careful politically. >> if something else were to happen, of course, a lot of people critical of not having done enough. mark, i want to turn to you on this. we heard a lot over the last decade about how much al qaeda has been weakened by the war on terror, but does this contradict that? do these closures suggest they are stronger than we've been led to believe? >> i don't want to say it's contradicted and david has put his finger on it. the fact of the matter is we've always known despite the killing of osama bin laden that there's been a series of franchise organizations directly related to al qaeda. they've been in the caucuses in the north africa and the al qaeda which committed attacks in amgeria, as well as in l
to the dramatic move. turns out, it wasn't just an intercepted message between sth man who replaced osama bin laden and the yemen leader. there's a leader of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and what we had heard before is that there was a call between the two. but now we're hearing something different. in fact, it's an exclusive report that we're getting today that perhaps more than 20 al qaeda operatives from around the world were on some sort of conference call and we were able to listen in on that. one of the reporters who broke that story is joining us now. john is the senior correspondent for national security and politics for "newsweek" and the daily beat. i don't want to ruin your story but tell our viewers what they need to know about this supposed conference call. >> right. so we know that u.s. intelligence has been monitoring multiple threat streams and multiple communication streams between al qaeda's core leadership in pakistan and their associates in yemen but what we're able to report new today with that, the call that actually led the worldwide terror alert and the closing of
of going after al qaeda directly. i don't think the administration that got osama bin laden, rhetorical bluster didn't bring oun osama bin laden, actual intelligence and aggressive maneuvers ron insana side of pakistan did. i don't think the former dictators in libya or in egypt would think that this president has been weak. i think what we've seen is a president who has tried to get the united states to conform and comport with the sort of moral standing that -- >> i don't think -- now i feel i need to counter on the other side, becae the fact of the matter is barack obama has adopted policies that i think have actually been less targeted. he will fire drones into countries where we aren't even at war. when we had a plan, a policy, a program that would allow us to go and snatch terrorists out like khalid sheikh mohammed. bring them out without killing their 4-year-old daughters, without killing their grandmothers, without killing everybody in the general vicinity. and i've got to say, nothing that he has done has made us comport to international standards more than under george w. bush
know, just a year ago, boasting al-qaeda is on the run, osama bin laden is dead, and now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. the travel alert, which lasts for a month, which incidentally, i'm not sure people understand, the state department hates to do that. this is the highest level -- the travel advisories they do routinely. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they're objecting to the ambassadors there. the ambassadors are cabling back to the state department, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? for the u.s. government, the state department to issue a travel alert for the next month means about the threat is serious. >> chris: senator demint, the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair now to criticize him for doing too much? >> well, it's clear that al-qaeda may be more of a threat to us they were before 9/11 now. we don't know exactly what all the intelligence is, but as you've heard from a lot of the experts on both sides the aisle in congress, there's a real thre
time they did this, when romney called him an apiecer, obama came out and said tell that to osama bin laden and the 15 leaders of al qaeda i've taken off the field. the notion that this guy is somehow appeasing our enemies is so preposterous. >> do you think they have polled on this, the neocons, they figure after the embarrassment of iraq, they wanted to fight the war. george w. wanted to fight it, and the vice president wanted to fight it. they all wanted to fight it. okay. they decided that we have sort of forgotten that, and now they're coming back. bolton is back, kristol is back. when they say retaliation, their idea of retaliation after 9/11, steve, was going into iraq. retaluation. what does that mean? >> i have never gotten the impression that their world views were radically altered by what happened in the last decade, after the invasion of iraq. i don't think the world view was changed. i think they sense an opportunity within the republican party, the argument in the republican party over foreign policy. whenever they see an opportunity to connect their agenda to oppositio
with terrorists, killing osama bin laden. en even this question of al qaeda's number two, ayman al zawahiri, there was a meeting the president attend wrd he wanted more vigilance in this fight. as tom donnelly would tell me, obama said here's the deal. i want this hunt for osama bin laden and ayman al zawahiri to come to the front of the line. i worry that the trail has gone cold. this has to be our top priority. you need to ensure that we have expended every effort to take down the top leadership of al qaeda, especially these two individuals. in light of your criticism about overreaction, there is still a very specific threat and a very specific operator who is atop these organizations. >> and there continue to be a specific threat and there will continue to be terrorism as there has been for as long as human history exists. terrorism is simply the weapon by which the weak engage the strong. and what they do is they cause the strong, in this case us, to overreact. we are the one who is went into iraq and spent about a trillion and a half dollars doing it, losing, what, 2,500 -- 4,500 young
we have made, getting osama bin laden, putting al qaeda between afghanistan and pakistan back on its heels that this radical, you know, violent extremism is still out there. >> jeremy, is this kind of a tricky line for him to walk, talking about this? of course, reminding everyone that the death of osama bin laden was under his watch but you have closings and evacuations that send a different message. >> that's right. i think jay leno asked the right question when he brought up ben ghazi. i think that looms large now over every decision that has to do with our installations overseas. the last thing that this white house wanted to have to deal with, i'm sure, is another attack on that scale. so, i mean, while al qaeda is definitely on the run, this is a reminder that, you know, while the president is trying to move on to other issues, whether it be housing policy, the environment, what have you, terrorism and the fight of it overseas is still a huge part of his portfolio. >> yeah, he answered a lot of questions. jay leno really playing the part of a reporter yesterday, including askin
qaeda's central control has ebbed and flowed. one of the geniuses of what osama bin laden set up, really, was local groups feeding on local grievances, taking advantage of local circumstances to advance the larger cause, which they can unite around. and as they apparently did in the case of this threat in yemen. al qaeda's not like a corporation or a division -- army division in the military. it's a different kind of organization. we have to recognize that. >> it seems that the leader of al qaeda now is not on the run. apparently the reports say we intercepted some type of phone conversation, a conference call of some sort between him and maybe 20 al qaeda officials. maybe it was an internet chat. maybe there were skyping. that sounds silly that al qaeda would be on the phone with a conference call. what do you think led to this tip to close these facilities and basically how do we know as i asked originally that the coast is clear? >> i think there was probably other information in addition to this conference call. i have to stay, just to stop right there, whether it was a conference ca
had been worth despite osama bin lauden. where do we draw the line? >> i think not just the ambiguous outcomes in the wars in afghanistan but also the libyan situation in which they thought we were doing good in the world, and we helped overthrow gaddafi, and then we had ambassador chris stevens, who was really a hero in the benghazi area killed in that very city when he was ambassador and then they have seen egypt and yemen erupt and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these
, the first time a global alert was issued since osama bin laden was killed in may 2011. joining me nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel. nice to have you this morning, richard. >> reporter: thank you. good to join you from a very hot day in cairo but i'm glad to be on your show. >> thanks. tell me a little, obviously we first started hearing about embassies closing beginning thursday night, then got hot sort of all day on friday. what is the administration saying about the scope of these embassy closings. >> the scope of the embassy closings, nbc consulate is very large. about 22 different facilities closed just today, although we're not exactly sure when some of these facilities will reopen. we spoke to a spokesperson today here in cairo and asked, okay, there is a closure. when is the embassy going to reopen. the spokesperson said, well, we're still evaluating. this is a blanket move. it is obviously very serious. what we know from talking to different sources is that the threat goes back to yemen. it's a very specific threat from al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, which is
to hear from the perpetrator himself. other than the occasional video from osama bin laden and the like, often those who commit horrific acts are kept from the lime light and disappear forever, like the aurora shooter or the boston marathon bomber. but today we all got a long, hard look at evil. we heard man, ariel castro, who pleaded guilty to unspeakable crimes to three young girls and their children. he tried to apologize, federal budget after -- even after he l distinct impression he didn't do anything that wrong. >> i have an addiction, just like an alcoholic has an addiction. alcoholics cannot control their addiction. that's why i couldn't control my addiction, your honor. these accusations that i would come home and beat her, beat them, those are totally wrong, your honor. because, like i said before, i am not a violent person. i'm not a violent person. i simply kept them there without allowing them to leave. >> it reminded some of us of that famous phrase, the benality of evil. and while what castro said today was infuriating and what he it was incomprehensible, you might not th
to coordinate, and if osama bin laden was calling someone in the united states, we n't his stockbroker.hat because people need to know that the government is not going to gary all this information on them and one day in the future use it against them or have it leaked. this is a legitimate issue, and balancing those is not easy, and i think what we're struggling with as a country, how to protect americans and also protect their individual liberties and private expectations. it's not a trivial issue. >> neil: looks like republican are having a hard time reconciling those two extremes to hear senator paul tell it, if we're getting these constant reports out of the nsa that it went beyond just collecting over 115 million american phone records, to the latest news that is was every e-mail, every site folks went on so much information, so fast, they really couldn't even hold it that long because it was too massive to hold. that does raise the kind of concerns that senator paul has had, that chris christie seems to dismiss. >> but first of all, of course, we always need to be reviewing the s
complicated, because pre-9/11 it was pretty much just afghanistan. it was osama bin laden, and al qaeda senior leadership. that has since spread to somalia, yemen. we have problems in mali now. there are cells in different places. but we also have many, many more assets that we have brought to bear to try to contain them. to try to take out their leadership and try to undermine their plans. so they are still a threat. i would not agree that they're stronger than pre-9/11. >> and one of the theories is that one of the reasons we're seeing these threats right now is in that there's a lot of anger behind recent drone attacks in some of the parts of the world where the embassies are being closed, particularly in yemen. do you think that the use of these drones, so commonly in that part of the world, is actually fueling more anti-american sentiment, that's ultimately making us less safe in those areas? >> well, i mean, it's hard to say. because on the one hand there's no question that the drone strikes have made us more safe. in one very clear way, they've undermined the ability of these folks to p
to what it was with osama bin laden. you got this global entity of cells, which may or may not be linked together, may be working entirely independently. very, very hard to take on an enemy like that. >> this is the problem with the war on terror, get osama bid laden and possible for new groups and cells to spring up. the situation we got we were able to have a return to normal where terrorism became a low-level threat, one of the things the president said in his interview with jay leno tonight, americans are much more likely to die in a car accident than terror attack. that's healthy the way they think of foreign policy and if there is a big event that happens in the middle east, i think it could change that in a negative way and force us, draw us back in. >> it has to be noted for the talk about the nsa and invasion of people's pra vice and so on and so on they are successful in a huge afrosty. >> think not why we've been successful in preventing come mess tick terrier -- >> do we know that? >> i wouldn't want to yield my personal or public serk ke secu. we see embassy bombings and ter
back when the hunt for osama bin laden was still raging, some intelligence forces believed al qaeda was even developing its own intranet that was electronically hidden behind jihadi websites and accessible to only a few people. whether they succeeded or such a system still exists like much of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. "outfront" next why dr. sanjay gupta change ed his mind on weed. an about-face and he h eel explain why. >>> then are you driving a compact car that failed a crash test? we have the alarming results. >>> and a double play. he made the catch but what he did next was the true score. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of
books on al qaeda. he produced the first tv interview of osama bin laden back in 1997. gregory johnsen is the author of the last refuge, yemen, al qaeda and america's war in arabia. welcome. peter, what triggered all of this as far as we understand it is the head of al qaeda sent a message to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, in yemen, asking them, you know, do some terrorism, please. >> yeah, do something. >> now, is that a sign of weakness or strength? >> it's a sign of just sending a message. i mean it's do something is pretty -- it's not like, you know, the end of the world is coming. and so far whatever that something is hasn't transpired. and i think that al qaeda central is aware of its own problems and even al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is not doing particularly well, despite all of the flurry of things we've seen over the past week. about 30 of their leaders and south operatives have been killed in cia drone strikes, so their bench is thinning. >> why has yemen become the next place, after afghanistan, pakistan? >> right. well, i think in yemen you have a very weak centra
and osama bin laden is dead. >> for al qaeda is a shell of its former self. groups must be dealt with. >> the united states is never going to retreat from the world. >> we don't get terrorized. >> senator, a moment ago, you said al qaeda is on the rise. you are not subjecting that al qaeda is stronger than it was pre9/11. >> i'm saying they me taft sized in a way they may pose threat threats throughout the middle east, they can destabilize missions, have acts of terror literally everywhere and there the perception throughout the mid aeflteastdle east that there is no policy and that there is accommodation it that reality. when they believe that, then you are going to see extremist element on the rise and clearly they are throughout the middle east. action of closing embassies shows they are mounting threats everywhere in the middle east against the united states of america and they are playing in ways that is going to pose challenge to the united states for years to come. >> you talked earlier about russia. i want to get back to that. obama cancelled a meetin
their chops on national security as a trumping thing against the democrats. i think obama because of osama bin laden, basically continuing the policies of his pred assessor is flank on 2012. all the national security stuff is going to be revisited in 2016 whether it's hillary clinton or someone else. republicans will want to lay the ground work. >> not to overstate the tea party but some of the tea party types, if they are taken seriously -- >> this is put your money where your mouth is. >> this is put your money where your mouth is time for these people. they should tell speaker boehner to cool it. this is our time. >> it is interesting this is coming, heather. talking about the resurgence of al qaeda and iraq, to have the conversation with that as a backdrop is theeth ka si of the reforms you are proposing. >>> coming up, a year ago mitt romney officially attacked paul ryan to be his running meat. they begin to speculate about 2016, not naming any names, a new book takes a look back. we will talk to dan balls about romney and the race that was, just ahead. >>> time for the "your business" en
lives and others, but it's a terrible thing. just a year ago, boasting, al-qaeda's on the run and osama bin laden is dead and now, an unprecedented closure of 22. >> i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true. is our attempt to placate part of the world, reset to whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working and the perception of weakness in this administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> they really are not working and the problem, i don't know, i look at this and you talk to the countersbel where she knows people and they say there was no reason to close 30 something embassies in madagascar of all places, where there isn't any jihadists. >> stayed open and had another benghazi, who would be criticizing the administration? >> but you don't run. his policy is run and hide. >> and john, let me go to you on this because when you talk about our foreign policy and where we go from here, there's a lot of pressure to focus on our switch to asia, but instead when we focus on the middle east, it's the one area where it's kind of quiet.
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
in the arabian peninsula. known as aqap. it is one of the most active and dangerous branches of the network osama bin laden founded. u.s. state department ordered americans out of the country tuesday, after u.s. intelligence officials intercepted communications between aqap and al qaeda al- zawahri. they say al-zawahri urged his followers in yemen to launch a major attack before the end of ramadan. the muslim holy week ends later this week. alfonso van marsh, wjz eyewitness news. >> the recent terror alert also triggered a other than wag for americans traveling overseas and prompted u.s. officials to temporarily close 19 embassies and consulates in the middle east and africa. >>> drivers, as we know, they come and go allidate at -- all day at gas stations. but this made a lasting impression. can you say that? a man crashed his rental car into the gas station in college hill, ohio. his car went to protect the pumps -- struck the barriers meant to protect the pumps. but guess what he does? the driver gets oust of the -- out of the car and hails a cab. trying to get away from the scene. fortunately,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)